Frances E. Lee

Prof. Frances E. Lee

Professor of Government and Politics, University of Maryland

Frances E. Lee is professor of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland where she teaches courses in American government, the public policy process, legislative politics, and political institutions. She is co-editor of Legislative Studies Quarterly, a scholarly journal specializing in legislatures.

Lee is author of Beyond Ideology: Politics, Principles, and Partisanship in the U.S. Senate (University of Chicago Press 2009) and coauthor of Sizing Up The Senate: The Unequal Consequences of Equal Representation (University of Chicago Press 1999). She is coauthor of a comprehensive textbook on the U.S. Congress, Congress and Its Members (Sage / CQ Press). Her research has also appeared in numerous journal outlets.

Her books have received national recognition, including the American Political Science Association's Richard F. Fenno Award for the best book on legislative politics in 2009 and the D. B. Hardeman Award presented by the Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation for the best book on a congressional topic in both 1999 and 2009. 

She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from Vanderbilt University in 1997. She was a Research Fellow at the Brookings Institution from 1997-98. From 1998 until joining UMD’s faculty in 2004 she taught in the political science department at Case Western Reserve University. In 2002-2003, she worked on Capitol Hill as an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow.



2015 National Lawyers Convention
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2015 National Lawyers Convention

The Role of Congress

The Mayflower Hotel
1127 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Click to play: Showcase Panel III: ROUNDTABLE: Can Changes in Incentives Significantly Address Congressional Dysfunction? - Event Audio/Video

Showcase Panel III: ROUNDTABLE: Can Changes in Incentives Significantly Address Congressional Dysfunction? - Event Audio/Video

2015 National Lawyers Convention

Over the years, and especially recently, it appears as though members of Congress primarily need...