Prof. Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz

Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center

Topics: Affirmative Action • Article I Initiative • Constitution • Federal Courts • Federalism • Federalism & Separation of Powers • Federalist Society • First Amendment • Founding Era & History • Fourteenth Amendment • International & National Security Law • Law & Economics • Politics • Separation of Powers • Supreme Court

Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz teaches constitutional law and federal jurisdiction, and he writes articles for the Harvard Law Review and the Stanford Law Review.

He is currently developing a new theory of constitutional interpretation and judicial review. The first installment, entitledThe Subjects of the Constitution, was published in the Stanford Law Review in May of 2010, and it is among the most downloaded articles about constitutional interpretation, judicial review, and/or federal courts in the history of SSRN. The second installment, The Objects of the Constitution, was published in May of 2011, also in the Stanford Law Review. And the comprehensive version is forthcoming as a book by Oxford University Press.

Rosenkranz has served and advised the federal government in a variety of capacities. He clerked for Judge Frank H. Easterbrook on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (1999-2000) and for Justice Anthony M. Kennedy at the U.S. Supreme Court (October Term 2001). He served as an Attorney-Advisor at the Office of Legal Counsel in the U.S. Department of Justice (November 2002 - July 2004). He often testifies before Congress as a constitutional expert—most recently before the House Financial Services Oversight Subcommittee, regarding the Obama Administration's use of bank settlement agreements to circumvent the Appropriations Clause. He has also filed briefs and presented oral argument before the U.S. Supreme Court. His most recent Supreme Court brief, in Los Angeles v. Patel, was cited by Justice Alito in dissent.

Rosenkranz is a member of the New York Bar and the U.S. Supreme Court Bar. He is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE).  He is a founding member of Heterodox Academy and a member of its Executive Committee. He also serves on the Board of Directors of the Federalist Society and as the faculty advisor to the Georgetown chapter.

2016 National Lawyers Convention

2016 National Lawyers Convention

The Jurisprudence and Legacy of Justice Scalia

The Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC 20036
Speakers:
Floyd AbramsSamuel A. AlitoJohn A. AllisonAkhil Reed AmarJohn S. BakerRachel BarkowCarlos T. BeaStephanos BibasSusan G. BradenMark BrnovichRonald A. CassLeonard N. ChaninBradford R. ClarkPaul D. ClementSteven CollotonTed CruzRon DeSantisFrank H. EasterbrookJohn C. EastmanAllison EidE ElliottJennifer Walker ElrodJames W. ElyRichard A. EpsteinWilliam N. EskridgeBrian FitzpatrickMark FloydDavid F. ForteNoel J. FranciscoRichard W. GarnettDeborah A. GarzaDouglas H. GinsburgAbbe R. GluckElizabeth GoiteinHenry GoldbergPhil GrammDeepak GuptaNikki HaleyThomas M. HardimanSeth HarrisJohn C. HarrisonLisa HeinzerlingArthur D. HellmanC HemphillRoderick M. HillsSandra Segal IkutaRandel K. JohnsonEdith H. JonesDavid J. KapposOrin S. KerrRaymond KethledgeAdam KleinWilliam KuntzPaul LarkinJoan LarsenGary LawsonAdam LaxaltNelson LundStephen J. MarkmanWilliam P. MarshallToni MassaroMichael W. McConnellThomas W. MerrillPatrick MorriseyAdam MossoffVincent Phillip MunozVictoria NourseDiarmuid F. O'ScannlainMichael O'SheaPatrick A. ParenteauMichael S. PaulsenMark PerryRoger PilonSaikrishna B. PrakashWilliam H. PryorDeborah L. RhodeNicholas Quinn RosenkranzAllan RostronBill SamuelJoshua SarnoffBen SasseEugene ScaliaKannon K. ShanmugamJerry E. SmithLawrence SolumIlya SominLuther StrangeDavid StrasKimberley A. StrasselNadine StrossenJeffrey S. SuttonDiane S. SykesClarence ThomasJonathan R. TurleyMichael UhlmannStephen I. VladeckEugene VolokhRichard E. WileyDon WillettTodd Zywicki
Topics: Federalism & Separation of Powers
Sponsors:
Supreme Court Preview: What Is in Store for October Term 2016?