Georgetown Law’s Federalist Society Student Chapter will host the 37th National Student Symposium on March 9-10, 2018. The topic of the Symposium is "First Principles of the Constitution."

Keynote Address by:

Justice Clarence Thomas,
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States


Photo credit: The Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

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REGISTRATION INFO:

In order to purchase tickets at the student rate, you must be an Active Student Member and logged into the website.

JOIN OR RENEW YOUR STUDENT MEMBERSHIP ($5):
https://fedsoc.org/join

Student Symposium Registration (includes all events except the Saturday night cocktail reception and banquet). Please note that the Friday night Supreme Court reception is CLOSED. We are at capacity.

  • $10 (student members)
  • $100 (non-students) (Friday night reception is not included for non-students.)

Banquet and Saturday night cocktail reception (This does not include Student Symposium registration):

  • $55 (student members)
  • $200 (non-students)

LODGING:

A block of rooms at a reduced rate are available at the Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill, 400 New Jersey Ave., N.W., Washington, DC until February 9, 2018. Click HERE to reserve a room or call (202) 737-1234 and indicate that you’d like to make a reservation under the Federalist Society room block. Rates are: Single or Double Occupancy ($179), Triple Occupancy ($204), or Quadruple Occupancy ($229).

50% TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP FOR DUES-PAYING STUDENT MEMBERS.
(TRAVEL ONLY—does not include lodging)
DOWNLOAD REIMBURSEMENT FORM HERE

SCHEDULE:

FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 2018

Debate: The Judicial Power: The Judicial Duty to Follow the Law or a Discretionary Power of Judicial Review?
6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Hart Auditorium, Georgetown University Law Center

Hamilton referred to the federal judiciary as the “least dangerous” branch of the new federal government.  But the Court has clearly done more than he envisioned.  What is its proper role?   How much should judges interpret the exact text and how much should they look to the core principles the text seeks to protect?

  • Justice Clint Bolick, Arizona Supreme Court
  • Chief Justice Stephen J. Markman, Michigan Supreme Court
  • Moderator: TBA

Cocktail Reception
8:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Supreme Court of the United States
1 First St., N.E., Washington, DC

(NOTE: Due to space constraints, the reception is only open to the first 300 law student registrants.)

SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 2018

Panel 1: The Relationship Between the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Hart Auditorium, Georgetown University Law Center

In 1776, the Continental Congress declared the birth of a new nation. Six of the men who signed the Declaration of Independence went on to craft and sign the Constitution in 1787. What role does the Declaration of Independence play in constitutional interpretation? Should it be considered foundational to the Constitution’s purpose and structure or is it just one source among many?

  • Prof. Randy E. Barnett, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Legal Theory, Georgetown Law
  • Prof. Michael P. Zuckert, Nancy Reeves Dreux Professor of Political Science, The University of Notre Dame
  • Prof. John Mikhail, Agnes N. Williams Research Professor; Associate Dean, Research and Academic Programs, Professor of Law, Georgetown Law
  • Prof. Lee J. Strang, John W. Stoepler Professor of Law & Values, The University of Toledo College of Law
  • Moderator: Judge Thomas Hardiman, United States Court of Appeals, Third Circuit

Panel 2: The Executive Power: Prerogative Versus Delegated Powers – A King Minus Powers Given to Congress or Subservient to the Legislature?
11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Hart Auditorium, Georgetown University Law Center

What role for the executive was envisioned by the Framers and Founding generation? How did the Founding generation understand the Executive’s role? How did the likely first President, George Washington shape their views? Has the role of the Executive changed?

  • Prof. Martin S. Flaherty, Leitner Family Professor, Co-Director, Leitner Center for International Law and Justice, Fordham University School of Law
  • Prof. John C. Yoo, Emanuel S. Heller Professor of Law and Co-Faculty Director, Korea Law Center, University of California, Berkeley Law School
  • Prof. Saikrishna Prakash, James Monroe Distinguished Professor of Law and Paul G. Mahoney Research Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law
  • Prof. Michael W. McConnell, Richard and Frances Mallery Professor and Director of the Constitutional Law Center, Stanford Law School
  • Moderator: Judge Amul Thapar, United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit

Lunch break
12:15 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Room TBA

Lunch Discussion: Becoming an Academic
12:30 - 1:45 PM
Room TBA

  • Prof. Josh Blackman, Associate Professor of Law, South Texas College of Law Houston
  • Prof. Renée Lettow Lerner, Donald Phillip Rothschild Research Professor, George Washington Law
  • Dr. Jesse Merriam, Assistant Professor and Pre-Law Advisor, Department of Political Science, Loyola University Maryland
  • Prof. David Hyman, Professor of Law, Georgetown Law
  • Moderator: Hon. Lee Liberman Otis, Senior Vice President & Director, Faculty Division, The Federalist Society

Lunch Discussion: Lawyers Division
12:30 - 1:45 PM
Room TBA

  • Ms. Erin Murphy, Partner, Kirkland & Ellis LLP
  • Mr. Alan Gura, Partner, Gura PLLC
  • Ms. Alyssa DaCunha, Counsel, Wilmer Hale
  • Mr. Prerak Shah, Chief of Staff to Senator Cruz
  • Moderator: Ms. Lisa Ezell, Vice President & Director, Lawyers Chapters, The Federalist Society

Panel 3: Reconstructing First Principles: The Fourteenth Amendment and the Constitution
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Hart Auditorium, Georgetown University Law Center

The Fourteenth Amendment dramatically changed constitutional law. How are we to understand these changes? Did the Fourteenth Amendment change our Federalism and, if so, how much?

  • Prof. John C. Harrison, James Madison Distinguished Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law
  • Prof. Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz, Professor of Law, Georgetown Law
  • Elizabeth B. Wydra, President, Constitutional Accountability Center
  • Prof. Kurt T. Lash, E. Claiborne Robins Distinguished Chair in Law, University of Richmond School of Law
  • Moderator: Judge Diane S. Sykes, United States Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit

Panel 4: Perfecting the Constitution - a Roundtable: Visions for the 28th Amendment
3:45 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Hart Auditorium, Georgetown University Law Center

Article V of the Constitution provides a process for amending the Constitution. However, this process has only produced a handful of Amendments. Many Amendments have been proposed throughout the nation’s history. What’s next? Looking to first principles, did the Founders leave anything out that is necessary today?  What possible Amendments might be desirable and practical?

  • Prof. Jamal Greene, Dwight Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
  • Prof. Laura Donohue, Professor of Law, Georgetown Law
  • Prof. Michael S. Greve, Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University 
  • Prof. John O. McGinnis, George C. Dix Professor in Constitutional Law, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law
  • Prof. Robin Fretwell Wilson, Roger and Stephany Joslin Professor of Law, Illinois College of Law
  • Moderator: Judge Amy Coney Barrett, United States Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit

Cocktail Reception
6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Ave., N.W.
Washington, DC

Banquet Dinner & Presentation of the Annual Joseph Story Award and Feddie Awards
7:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill
400 New Jersey Ave., N.W.
Washington, DC

  • Keynote: Justice Clarence Thomas, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States